Talgarth Asylum Wales

The building, designed by Messrs Giles, Gough and Trollope of London followed the compact arrow plan and was built at a cost of £126,000. It was opened amid public ceremony on March 18, 1903, by the Rt. Hon. Lord Glanusk who said of it "everything has been done that human ingenuity could devise for the happiness and safety of the inmates, and under the blessing of God, for their speedy restoration to health." Like other contemporary institutions, the asylum was designed to be self-sufficient, and had its own private water, electricity, heating and sewerage systems as well as a considerable agricultural estate on which able-bodied patients worked to produce food for the hospital. As well as residential wards, the hospital had a large recreation and dining hall, kitchens, workshops "in which the patients [were] encouraged to spend their time profitably", a tailor, bakery, shoe-maker and printing shops as well as 8 acres of market gardens

Initially dedicated to treating patients from the counties of Brecknockshire and Radnorshire, after the First World War, patients from Montgomeryshire were also admitted, and the 'asylum' was extended and renamed the "Mid-Wales Counties Mental Hospital.

In 1948 the hospital became part of the National Health Service. NHS management brought a number of innovations, including art and occupational therapy and the integration of the sexes, who had previously occupied opposite sides of the hospital. The site also became home to the Mid and West Wales College of Nursing and Midwifery and the Powys Drugs & Alcohol Council for substance misuse. Other services included treatments for the elderly mentally ill, rehabilitation and continuing care, day care, reflexology, physiotherapy, electro-convulsive therapy; chiropody and psychiatry.

With the advent of 'Care in the Community' and changing attitudes towards mental healthcare, services at the hospital were wound down during the 1990s and the last wards closed in 1999. Some facilities moved into nearby Bronllys Hospital (formerly the South Wales Sanitorium

Following closure, the buildings and surrounding estate were sold to the former Chief Medical Officer for just £227,000. Plans were subsequently made to redevelop the site as business park, and indeed several buildings were converted and occupied by local companies as part of the "Black Mountains Business Park". However, due to the site's isolated location and the global recession, the venture failed and only one or two businesses remained on the site by early 2009

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